Are You That Annoying Actor Friend?

Are You That Annoying Actor Friend?

Have you ever gotten annoyed seeing an actor friend’s post on Instagram, Facebook, or Twitter? What was it that annoyed you? Perhaps it’s the common mistake of blasting the same exact content everywhere? Or was it the self-promotional tone of the post itself?

You have to be very careful with what and how you share things online. Social media can really help or hurt you. Today, I want to teach you how to keep your audience happy—whether you're an actor or not! 

Let’s start with a simple formula. Memorize this.

 
 

 

1. Content is King

It all comes down to good content. You could know exactly when and how to share something on each social network, but if the content isn’t top-notch, it’s not going to get maximum engagement. What’s going to compel people to like, comment, or (best yet) share your post? Great content!

 

2. Consistency is Queen

It’s important you establish a consistent presence—both frequency of posting and quality. In terms of consistency, I’d emphasize quality (the value, voice, and purpose of your posts) over the frequency.

Take pressure off yourself to post daily. I believe in staying active, but I don’t think that has to be self-created content or a one-way broadcast every single day.

It’s called social media. Let your life and career dictate when you want (or need) to share something. In terms of frequency, just make sure you’re consistently social! Give as much support and love as you give out your own content!

For example, if you’re consistently (and authentically) engaging with a VIP’s content, they’re going to be more willing to like, follow, or friend you. Many actors make the mistake of relentless self-promotion—a one-way monologue all about themselves. Keep your audience (especially your VIPs) top of mind and stay social. Engage in a dialogue and cater your content to your audience, not your ego.

 

3. Context is God

This is really the takeaway of this blog. We’ve talked about how the social networks are all different rooms in your empire, right? The Facebook family room, Pinterest parlor, Twitter treehouse, etc. Play the role of a DJ or chef on your staff. Mix the ingredients for each room, like multiple appetizers from the same ingredients or various remixes of the same song.

In PR, this is calling “spinning” the story. It’s the same content or ingredients, but it’s designed and presented specifically for each distribution outlet.

It’s not a hard and fast rule to not post the same exact content more than once or in more than one place. However, it’s best practice to honor the context of the platform and your audience above all. Then you’re sure not to annoy your friends, but gather an enthusiastic audience.


Do you think an all points bulletin (the same post on all channels) is more or less effective than specificity and placement? Comment below!

Tony Howell is a digital strategist dedicated to helping you design your future—creating offline success from your online presence.